Tag Archive: salads


 

I owe you a potato salad recipe!  I really meant to get this recipe posted last week, but I didn’t manage to get it written before leaving for a long weekend in Virginia (if you’re ever in Williamsburg, try The Trellis) and then this past week turned out to be unexpectedly busy!  But I haven’t forgotten about the potato salad I promised you on Twitter!

The thought process behind this potato salad: “Oh crap, I still haven’t used those garlic scapes I bought at the farmer’s market last week!  Are they even still good?  Oh and the mushrooms!  And the bag of potatoes!  And the asparagus!  What can I make with mushrooms, garlic scapes, asparagus and potatoes??? …Potato salad!”

As I detest mayonnaise, I decided to make a yogurt-based potato salad.  Plain Greek yogurt provides both a wonderful creamy texture and a nice tang, which I amped up even more by adding some soft goat cheese and a little dijon mustard.  (Emphasis on little.  I’m not a fan of mustard but my husband loves it so we compromise).

Garlic Scapes!

lonely corn

As I was chopping up the potatoes I remembered that I also had a lonely ear of corn in the back of the fridge.  So in that went as well!  All in all it turned out to be quite good, both as an entree and as a side dish.  (And as a way to clean out my fridge!)  So the next time you have some potatoes and other random vegetables hanging around, make yourself some potato salad!

 

On a plate!

Potato Salad with Asparagus

  • 2lbs small red potatoes, diced into bite-sized chunks
  • 1 bunch of asparagus
  • 1-2 ears of sweetcorn
  • 1 bundle of garlic scapes
  • a handful of Italian flat leaf parsley
  • 1c chopped mushrooms (I used shiitake)
  • 1c plain Greek yogurt
  • 2oz soft goat cheese
  • 1/2tsp vinegar
  • 1/4tsp dijon mustard (more if you like it)
  • olive oil
  • salt
  • pepper

Put your potatoes into a large pot of salted water and bring to a boil.  Reduce the heat slightly and let them cook until the potatoes are tender, but not falling apart.  (You don’t want potato mush in your potato salad!)  While the potatoes are boiling, drop your shucked ear(s) of corn into the water for about a minute or so.  Pull the corn out with a pair of tongs, run some cold water over it to stop the cooking, and then set it aside to let it cool the rest of the way. When the potatoes are done, drain them, and set them aside to cool.

Meanwhile, get out a medium sized skillet and heat it over medium heat.  Add a splash of olive oil and then toss in your mushrooms and garlic scapes.  Saute for a few minutes until the mushrooms are browned, then remove the skillet from the heat and let the mushrooms and garlic scapes cool as well.

While you’re waiting for everything to cool, in a small bowl, whisk together the Greek yogurt, goat cheese, vinegar, mustard, and pepper.  Taste it as you go, and adjust the ingredients to your preferences.  Set aside.

Get out a large bowl, and stand your ear(s) of corn on end and shave off the kernels into the bowl.  Then chop the asparagus into inch-long segments and add it to the bowl as well.  Add your cooled potatoes as well as your mushrooms and garlic scapes, and then add the yogurt mixture.  With a spatula or wooden spoon, gently fold everything together until all of the components are well-coated with the yogurt mixture.  Season with salt and more pepper to taste and enjoy!

Beets like citrus.  This is a general rule of thumb, and is quite useful for throwing together a quick salad.  But today I discovered that beets love kumquats!  The combination of flavors–sour from the juice of the kumquats, sweet from their rinds, and earthy from the beets is incredible.  You definitely want to try this one.

Beets and Kumquats

Beet and Kumquat Salad

  •  1 beet (cooked til soft, peeled and cooled)
  • 2 handfuls of kumquats

Dice the beet and put it in a bowl.  Wash the kumquats and cut them in half (thirds if they’re big).  Toss them together with the beets, pouring any juice that you lose while halving the kumquats over the mix.  You want about equal parts beet pieces and kumquat halves.  Toss together and enjoy!

Serves 1-2

Note: This would probably also be good with a dark, leafy green like kale.

Another note written after eating this salad for dinner:  The sourness of the kumquats builds up, not unlike how the burning from spicy peppers builds up.  I would not advise eating large quantities of this all at once.  Also, if your kumquats are particularly sour, you might consider either adding a bit of sugar, some sweet fruits, or more beets.  That said, it’s still a good flavor combo!

And just like that a month goes by and it’s April.  Apologies again for the lack of posts–especially after I had promised you all new posts!  I do have one dish that I made during that week after my last post that I’ll write about later (it was a Thai-inspired curry dish), but it’s a new month and for now I’d rather write about something new!

I went to the grocery store this week at about quarter after 9 on Tuesday morning.  On the one hand, this is an utterly ideal time to go to the grocery store because (at least by this store’s standards), it is empty. No fighting people to get your cart through the aisles…heck, there are actually carts available! The downside, though, is that clearly their shipments of produce must arrive on Wednesday or Thursday because there was not a whole lot to choose from, and a lot of what was there was pretty sad.  I quickly had to scrap plans to get some kale, or my second choice of spinach.  I did find the last good bunch of big organic beets, so I do have beet greens to work with, and then I found some watercress.

I’ve never bought watercress before.  I’ve had it a few times, mostly in foreign countries.  But it was one of the few greens they had that weren’t completely wilted and pathetic looking.  So I decided on the spur of the moment that I was going to make a watercress salad.  Which is weird for me since normally I don’t consider salads to be meals.  But I’ve had this for dinner the past two nights and it’s actually turned out to be quite good and filling.

But what else to put with the watercress?  I had bought pancetta for another recipe (I’m on a bit of a Jamie Oliver kick lately–more on that later), so that was definitely going to go in there.  I also wanted something sweet, but there’s not much in season right now in the fruit department (and the stuff from Chile is all coated in a thick layer of wax that’s impossible to remove!), so I decided to grate up a carrot, which worked out nicely.  I also added a couple green onions, just to get another flavor in there, and to tie it all together I made a dressing with lemon zest, lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper.  Finally, I topped the salad off with some grated Parmesan cheese.  All in all?  Definitely a recipe worth repeating!

watercress

pancetta

lemon dressing

watercress salad

 

Watercress and Pancetta Salad

Salad

  • 1 bunch watercress, washed and picked over
  • 1 carrot, grated
  • 2 green onions, finely chopped
  • approx. 6 slices of pancetta or bacon (more or less to taste)
  • Parmesan cheese (to taste)

Dressing

  • zest of 1 lemon
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • olive oil (equal to lemon juice)
  • salt and pepper to taste

Wash and pick over the watercress, throwing away any bad leaves, tear it into bite sized pieces, and put it in a big bowl.  Grate the carrot and add it to the bowl with the watercress.  Chop the onions and do the same.  Cook the pancetta in a nonstick pan until nicely golden and crispy.  Tear it up and add it to the bowl.

To make the dressing, zest the lemon using a grater or microplane*.  Only get the yellow part of the zest–not the white part.  Put the zest in a bowl or 2 cup measure.  Cut the lemon in half and squeeze the juice in with the zest, being careful not to lose any seeds.  Add the olive oil, salt, and pepper and whisk it all together.  When you’re ready to eat, drizzle the dressing over the salad and top with a good amount of Parmesan cheese.

 

*Be VERY careful to keep your thumb away from the microplane.  Seriously.